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REVIEW: SARA TINDLEY - LUCKY THE SUN
Lucky The Sun

Sara Tindley
Lucky The Sun

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Wild & Unknown

Sara Tindley
Wild & Unknown

Time

Sara Tindley
Time

Time - Digital Single

Sara Tindley
Time - Digital Single

5 Days

Sara Tindley
5 Days

Dan Condon, Time Off

Byron Bay-based singer-songwriter Sara Tindley has captured the attention of musicians and broadcasters across the nation with her latest effort Lucky The Sun, the follow up to 2003's 5 Days.

Tindley has an interesting lyrical sense, often relying on the use of imagery to propel the narrative in her songs. One would imagine this style of writing to be quite difficult and terribly awkward if not done well, but Tindley manages to pull it off seemingly effortlessly.

Lyrically, she shows shades of Paul Kelly and Tim Rogers while musically sticking to a Lucinda Williams-esque country pop sound that's about as sweet as anything that's come out of the country for quite some time. There's something uniquely Australian about Lucky The Sun; it's honest, funny, sad and has an overall laid-back, almost careless feel.

Bill Chambers once again proves himself to be one of the most important figures in Australian country music as his tasteful production makes the songs sparkle and his delicate guitar work adds another element to a number of the tracks.

This is a compulsory listening for all supporters of Australian roots music, the only problem being its punishing ability to put other more lauded artists to shame.




Bernard Zuel, Sydney Morning Herald

The best thing that can happen to Byron-based Sara Tindley with her second album is that the local country scene ignores her. She is too good a songwriter and too diverse in her influences and styles for that moribund environment where they celebrate "authentic" mediocrity and drag everything down to that level. Tindley's mix is a roots melange with country as its dominant, but not overwhelming flavour. So alongside the slide guitar of producer Bill Chambers and the classic harmonies there's country soul in Rambling Ways and Dirt Music which bring to mind Shelby Lynne, while Rain Falls deserves some of the attention we've already paid to Tift Merritt. A strong '70s singer/songwriter mood infiltrates True Believer and Heart It Was A Desert suggests someone has been listening to Patty Griffin. Even when the territory is more straight line the excellent players - James Gillard, Will Grahame, Jeff McCormack and Mitch Farmer join Chambers - bring a lovely swing to Anchor Me. This is a good album so let's hope the city picks her up before Tamworth ruins things.







Tim Ritchie ABC Radio National Breakfast 2006

It’s nice to find reality... and here’s a slice of it...


Mandy Nolan, Byron Echo 2006

...beautiful, moody, evocative...

Bill Chambers, Producer 2006

I loved working on Sara's album. So rare to find such a great singer who writes amazing lyrics. Her songs make you believe she has lived them.

Martin Jones, Rhythms Magazine 2007

The fist time that I put Sara Tindley's Lucky The Sun into the CD player , I was immediatly stuck by the strength of  both the sounds and the songs. The first time True Believer came sighing out of the speakers, I was certain that Tindley had astutely selected some long lost classic to cover as the centrepiece to her second album. My admiration for Tindley redoubled  when I discovered that True Believer was her own composition.
Indeed all the songs on Lucky the Sun are Tindley's own, and there's not a weak one among them...



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