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REVIEW: SARA TINDLEY - TIME
Time

Sara Tindley
Time

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Wild & Unknown

Sara Tindley
Wild & Unknown

Time - Digital Single

Sara Tindley
Time - Digital Single

Lucky The Sun

Sara Tindley
Lucky The Sun

5 Days

Sara Tindley
5 Days

Matt Hill - Scene

The mood of Sara Tindley's third album is captured in the first 20 seconds of the opener, Golden. A gentle warmth and cautious optimism seem to flow straight from the tremolo guitar and brushed drumkit and, by the time the bridge arrives, the lyric makes it concrete: "Pare it back to only what is real and true/ and then maybe I'll be golden too".



Like Gillian Welch, Tindley trades in fine songwriting and strong performance skills, offering intimacy and insight within the confines of a contemporary country/folk tradition. Tindley's rich and savoury vocal is accompanied by guitars, bass and drums with other acoustic colours added with the occasional piano accordion, piano, ukulele or banjo part.



Tracks like the ukulele-driven Time and Love have a joyful lilt which help to keep the extroverted Subterranean Homesick Blues-esqe Highway from feeling too out of context. Other songs are more reflective, such as Country Girl with its melancholy refrain, "I'm a country girl far from home". The dark and sparse Water Ran Red tells the story of an Aboriginal woman's escape from a massacre of around 50 men, women and children for the killing of a sheep. With so many strong tracks my only reservation was the reprise of Country Girl with an a cappella version at the end of the album.





Bernard Zuel - SMH

The best moment on this album by far, is its final one, a reprise of an earlier track, Country Girl, done a capella. The Appalachian feel, the quirks in Sara Tindley's voice and the story all come together so sublimely, you can't help but wish there are more like that. Still, Tindley finds a comfortable path between lightly polished country, such as Time, Highway and Eve's Garden, and songs that have their roots a little deeper in the folk soil, like the winding Water Ran Red and Nights Falling. It would have been a better album still if she had gone further down the more austere path of producer Chris Parkinson's band, The Yearlings, but that's still possible next time around.




Martin Jones - Rhythms Magazine

Sara Tindley suffered a bit of an artistic crisis in the lead up to this, her third album. The crisis was really a loss of artistic innocence. At the beginning of her career, Tindley was ingenious, musically naive in many respects, free to make her music as and when she saw fit. And it was all the more charming for its ingenuousness. After the release of 'Luck The Sun', well-meaning 'experts' suddenly started paying attention and offering all kinds of advice. The worst thing an artist can do is listen to such advice. Tindley, it seems, soon realised this, though it took her a good while to get back to the instincts that had served her so well. Of her own volition, she approached Adelaide outfit The Yearlings, after being enchanted by their live performance, and asked if they'd record her next album with her.



Once again, Tindley's instincts have paid off in spades. Chris Parkinson and Robyn Chalklen emerge perfect foils for Tindley, Chalklen a like-minded female presence whose vocals and guitar playing hover around Tindley's like a caring big sister, and Parkinson's guitar  playing adding ture grit to her songs in generous, wholesome servings. Add contributers like drummer BJ Barker, Lyndon Gray, Richard Coates and record-live-in-any-room guru Mick Wordley, and the ingredients could hardly have been better selected.



How important is all that stuff in relation Tindley's songs? Couldn't Tindley have sat down with just a guitar and microphone and sung these songs effectively on her own? Well, no. As strong as these songs are, the joy and confidence Tindley has drawn from playing and recording with these guys is palpablein almost every second of this album. And that is taking no credit away from Tindley. On the contrary, she made the choice, took the punt and rose to the occasion with another batch of pure, affecting, honest and intuitive Australian country songs. That are, once again, now stuck in my head for the forseeable future.




Lucky Oceans - Feature Album, ABC Radio National Daily Planet

An easy-rolling, country-inflected album that doesn't shy away from some of life's darker aspects. 'Time' is a warm-sounding, in-the-room album, recorded live to tape in South Australia with production and playing by Chris Parkinson of the Yearlings.



Lou Fulco - Readings

"Rootsy, folky, melodic, rambling...there is something distinctly unique in Sara Tindley's style. Sara is a storyteller of the highest order and all of the songs have their own life lesson to tell...both joyous and raw, emoting a narrative style that puts you in the heart of her world"



Adelaide Review - Semaphore Music Festival

The Semaphore Music Festival has moved away slightly from its acoustic origins to become a much more encompassing event. It is now in its seventh year and attracts artists from around Australia eager to perform at the four-day event.



This year’s action takes place in assorted live music venues and clubs in Semaphore along with some free entry events on the foreshore. Melbourne-based singer songwriter Broderick Smith, the legendary frontman of seminal Australian country rock band The Dingoes, is one of the headline acts. Smith, who now plays in blues band The Backsliders, will also have the services of ARIA award winning guitarist Matt Walker at his disposal and will take part in an APRA songwriting panel alongside Walker and Sara Tindley.



Tindley is a singer/songwriter from Byron Bay who will use the festival to mark the beginning of a national tour to launch her third solo album, Time, recorded in SA with help from local act The Yearlings.



“I’d previously worked a few times with The Yearlings’ drummer, BJ Barker, so when they played in Mullumbimby in October last year, he invited me to see them,” Tindley explains. “I thought they were just fantastic. It’s hard to explain how The Yearlings made me feel but it’s like they just strip everything down to only the essentials.



“I’d been trying to get a new album together for a while so I when I found out they had a home studio I gave them a call.”



Tindley, who in the past has worked with Bill Chambers as her mentor and producer, headed down south to record with The Yearlings at their studio in the Fleurieu Peninsula in April this year. Adelaide musicians Richard Coates (piano accordion and piano) and Lyndon Gray (double bass) also helped flesh out the sound.



“There’s something about a collaborative effort and the joy of players all being in the same room together,” says Tindley, who had all but one song of the album’s dozen tunes worked up before going into the studio.



“I feel really great about the finished album because everything that I hoped for came out. It’s a really honest reflection of where I am as a singer, musician and songwriter.”



Tindley, who will be backed by The Yearlings at Semaphore Music Festival, will also be on an APRA songwriting panel for the event.



“I’m really honoured to be asked to be on a songwriting panel that also includes Broderick Smith and Matt Walker,” she says. “I’ll be in very fine company.”



The boutique festival will feature Semaphore Songs as part of its program. Some of Adelaide’s finest singer/songwriters, including Heather Frahn, Don Morrison, John Baker, Soursob Bob, Emily Davis, Cal Williams Jnr, Mick Kidd, Melody Feder and Glenn Skuthorpe along with Brillig’s Matt Swayne and Elizabeth Reid will be penning material based on stories, incidents, events and memories evoked by Semaphore. The songwriters will be presenting their compositions at the Semaphore RSL Clubrooms on Monday, October 3 from 2pm until 4.30pm and local singer and actor Eileen Darley will act as compere.







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